The Guardian view on Delhi’s pollution: when smog stops play

first_imgShare on Facebook Opinion comment Support The Guardian Delhi Share on WhatsApp Cricket isn’t cricket without the occasional “rain stopped play” that has marked – not often enough for English taste – the Ashes test in Adelaide. But rain is not the only reason why cricket matches sometimes have to be halted. Snow, dazzling sunshine and a solar eclipse have all brought games to an early end. So have hedgehogs, pigs, snakes and cars on the pitch. But cricket’s love of the eccentric gave way to a truly disturbing interruption on Sunday when Delhi’s bad air pollution – which was 15 times the WHO’s recommended toxicity maximum – caused stops and starts to a test between India and Sri Lanka. With players forced to leave the game to vomit and Sri Lankans wearing anti-pollution masks on the field, this was a Delhi clean-up call. If India’s favourite sport can’t be played in the nation’s smog-laden capital, cricket in Delhi should be no-balled. Reuse this content Cricket Share on Messenger South and Central Asia Share via Email Share on Pinterest Since you’re here… India Share on LinkedIn Pollution Sri Lanka Share on Twitter … we have a small favour to ask. More people, like you, are reading and supporting the Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we made the choice to keep our reporting open for all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford to pay.The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We hope you will consider supporting us today. We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism that’s open and independent. Every reader contribution, however big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Topicslast_img

Leave your comment